Refugee Screening: A Brief Introduction (and Request for Equipment)

Published today on The Science Creative Quarterly.

Southern Reflection

Oils on 50 x 60 cm stretched canvas (web store).

Since I feel like this short online essay actually culminates years of research (quite by accident), I feel compelled to reiterate the usual social truth of such things: all the mistakes are mine and all the right stuff took a lot of help from my friends. I have so many people to thank for supporting me in continuing my work—even as what that means continues to evolve. It is with warm gratitude that I recognize and celebrate my friends at Hack42 in Holland where my artist residency has given me so much inspiration, Osaka University in Japan where presenting this research-in-progress at their American Studies Seminar last spring as an Emerging Scholar helped me have faith in its importance and see where it could improve, and the hacker, artist, and other scenes in Berlin that feed my heart and mind so well. I also remain grateful for the following research funding sources that supported parts of this and other related research—a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship, NSF Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant, University of Virginia Raven Society Fellowship, UVA Society of Fellows Fellowship, Louise and Alfred Fernbach Award for Research in International Relations, and William McMeekin, Michael & Andrea Leven, and Bernard Marcus Institute for Humane Studies Fellowships—and to particularly thoughtful and engaging partners in dialogue Rop Gonggrijp, Arjen Kamphuis, Jos Weyers, and Ken Alder in this post-doctoral phase; George Klosko, Sidney Milkis, and Nick Winter in dissertation-land; Robert Fatton, Michele Claibourn, and Stephen Fienberg in my early graduate research and beyond; and Clay Ford, my stats buddy and fellow-traveller into the brave new world of Bayes throughout.

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